Multiple Molecular Pathways Unfolding the Pathophysiology of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Main Article Content

Simerjeet Kaur Chahal, Pradeep Goyal, Rupinder Kaur Sodhi

Abstract

Due to the abnormally elevated amounts of androgens women infected thruPolycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) will practiceindications such as acne, hair loss, and obesity. Around 20% of women of reproductive age are impacted by it.Clinical symptoms include menstrual irregularities, miscarriages, dysfunction of follicular maturation, polycystic morphology of ovaries, obesity, acne, alopecia and hirustism.Previous studies have shown that PCOS women remainby high risk for metabolic and cardiovascular disorders as well cancers of reproductive system. Any disturbance of orchestrated chain of hormonal and genetic events can progress towardspolycystic ovaries and associated flaws. Expressions of certain genes such as sirtuins, chromobox homolog 2 (CBX2), kisspeptin, micro RNAs etc can immensely manipulate hyperandrogenism and/or hyperinsulinemia. Enhanced cytokine levels and related signaling pathways also emergein the pathophysiology of PCOS. The purpose of suchrevisionremains to explore the hormonal, biochemical, inflammatory, novel genomic and neuroendocrine profiles alliedthruPCOS that might lead towards the deeper understanding of this condition. This illumination can conquer new battlegrounds for the creation of possible and highly successful therapeutic strategies to improve the management of this syndrome and to minimise the risk of long-term complications. Simultaneously, high prevalence of pathological parameters among PCOS women also necessitates an early-stage diagnosis to control the high morbidity rates associated with it.

Article Details

How to Cite
Simerjeet Kaur Chahal, Pradeep Goyal, Rupinder Kaur Sodhi. (2021). Multiple Molecular Pathways Unfolding the Pathophysiology of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome. Annals of the Romanian Society for Cell Biology, 3746 - 3765. Retrieved from http://annalsofrscb.ro/index.php/journal/article/view/487
Section
Articles