Assessment of Social Aspects among Nurses Caring COVID-19 Patients in Hilla City/ Iraq

Main Article Content

Mohammed Shaker Saeed, Naji Yaser Saadoon, Nada Khazal Kadhim Hindi

Abstract

Objectives: The infection COVID-19 a current illness that affects an oversized variety of individuals and therefore a lot of them within the world died. a major deal of social issues throughout the care of patients with COVID-19.This study aimed at assessing the social aspects among nurses; and determine the factors associated with their aspects.


Methodology: A non-probability (convenience sample) of 200 subjects were selected throughout the use of nonprobability sampling approach and The analysis was done by way of description and conclusion applied mathematics information analysis approach that features, frequencies, percentages; Chi-squared test".


Results: A recent findings indicate that 67.5% were aged young adults, 58.5% & 58% male married nurses,  works less than 10 years and diploma graduated. Overall, findings reveal the majority of 53% of nurses were negative social aspects during the care of patients with COVID-19 in Hilla City. there's no important relationship between nurses social aspect and their demographic characteristics at p-value>0.05, except, there was a relationship with their marital status and their residences at p-value ≤0.05.


Conclusion: Overall, a nurse caring for COVID-19 patients had negative social support. It is believed that the support given to nurses during a pandemic is crucial Because standing socially learned from relatives helps nurses to control negative situations in difficult times, Supporting nurses to believe they are not isolated to deal with such issues.

Article Details

How to Cite
Mohammed Shaker Saeed, Naji Yaser Saadoon, Nada Khazal Kadhim Hindi. (2021). Assessment of Social Aspects among Nurses Caring COVID-19 Patients in Hilla City/ Iraq. Annals of the Romanian Society for Cell Biology, 8007–8012. Retrieved from https://annalsofrscb.ro/index.php/journal/article/view/3497
Section
Articles